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I’ll have you know that I was laughing… For a very long time….

I’ll have you know that I was laughing… For a very long time….

(Source: ornithomantist)

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centuriespast:

A locket with hair from Mary Shelley and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. CreditBodleian Library, Oxford

centuriespast:

A locket with hair from Mary Shelley and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. CreditBodleian Library, Oxford

(Source: The New York Times, via ornithomantist)

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carminagf:

Miranda-The Tempest (detail). 1916. John William Waterhouse

carminagf:

Miranda-The Tempest (detail). 1916. John William Waterhouse

(via ettuterra)

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ancientart:

Roman tombstone, which reads in Latin:
REBVRRVS FR(i)A/TTON(i)S f(ilius) EQVES AL(a)/ FR(ON)T(ONIANA)
(Tombstone of Reburrus, son of Friatto, horseman of the Ala Frontoniana…)
Reburrus was of German descent and served in an auxialiary unit of the Roman Army. In the 1st century the Ala Frontoniana was stationed first in Bonn, then in the area of Moers-Asberg. Reburrus is depicted as a victor over the Germans.
Photo taken at the Archaeological Park Xanten by Ad Meskens via the Wiki Commons.

ancientart:

Roman tombstone, which reads in Latin:

REBVRRVS FR(i)A/TTON(i)S f(ilius) EQVES AL(a)/ FR(ON)T(ONIANA)

(Tombstone of Reburrus, son of Friatto, horseman of the Ala Frontoniana…)

Reburrus was of German descent and served in an auxialiary unit of the Roman Army. In the 1st century the Ala Frontoniana was stationed first in Bonn, then in the area of Moers-Asberg. Reburrus is depicted as a victor over the Germans.

Photo taken at the Archaeological Park Xanten by Ad Meskens via the Wiki Commons.

(via byronofrochdale)

Quote
"Although barely out of adolescence…[Shelley] was, in 1813, an ardent radical and anti-monarchist. Physically, he was rather odd, tall and slim to the point of limpness, with a high-pitched effete voice; but what he lacked in physical bulk he more than made up for in charismatic intensity. Among the earliest witnesses to this intensity were his school fellows at Eton, where he was sent by his landowning father when he was twelve. Initially he was bullied for his refusal to ‘fag’ for older boys, but the bullies soon discovered that in spite of his feeble frame, Shelley was not a boy to succumb quietly to taunts. On the contrary, he could be terrifying when roused, and was quite capable of reciprocal acts of violence. He stabbed one tormentor’s hand with a fork, and others remembered him as an almost unearthly creature, with flashing eyes, wild hair, and deathly white cheeks."

young romantics - daisy hay (via revolutionariess)

that’s it. that’s Romanticist scholarship.

(via marygodwinning)

(Source: tobiasfitzosborness, via byronofrochdale)

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hellenismosandme:

The first day of the month is sacred Selênê, Titaness of the Moon and Months. She brings to us the new month, Metageitnion.
“Hail, white-armed goddess, bright Selene, mild, bright-tressed queen! ” -Homeric Hymn #32

hellenismosandme:

The first day of the month is sacred Selênê, Titaness of the Moon and Months. She brings to us the new month, Metageitnion.

Hail, white-armed goddess, bright Selene, mild, bright-tressed queen! ” -Homeric Hymn #32

(via mythologer)

Photoset

nuclearpomegranate:

Once again.

Tags: Van Gogh
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hellenismo:

"the essence of our religion", the sacred initiations… “Blessed is he who, being fortunate and knowing the initiatory rites (τελετὰς θεῶν) of the Gods, keeps his life pure and has his soul initiated into the Bacchic revels, dancing in inspired frenzy over the mountains with holy purifications, and who, revering the mysteries of great mother Kybele, brandishing the thyrsos, garlanded with ivy, serves Dionysus.” (Eur. Bacchae 72-74) [Altar from Phlya (Chalandri), 360/370 CE. Group of Iacchus, Demeter, Rhea and Kore. Athens, National Archaeological Museum]

hellenismo:

"the essence of our religion", the sacred initiations…
“Blessed is he who, being fortunate and knowing the initiatory rites (τελετὰς θεῶν) of the Gods, keeps his life pure and has his soul initiated into the Bacchic revels, dancing in inspired frenzy over the mountains with holy purifications, and who, revering the mysteries of great mother Kybele, brandishing the thyrsos, garlanded with ivy, serves Dionysus.” (Eur. Bacchae 72-74)
[Altar from Phlya (Chalandri), 360/370 CE. Group of Iacchus, Demeter, Rhea and Kore. Athens, National Archaeological Museum]

(via byronofrochdale)

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laescrituradesatada:

Lord Byron
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classicalsketchbook:

The Birds by Aristophanes, an ancient Greek comedy.
.
Title sheet from a performance at Cambridge University in 1883

classicalsketchbook:

The Birds by Aristophanes, an ancient Greek comedy.

.

Title sheet from a performance at Cambridge University in 1883

(via byronofrochdale)

Photoset

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Chaironeia / The Lion of Chaironeia:

One of the most important battles of the greek antiquity was fought in the small plain of Chaironeia between Mount Thourion and river Kephesos. In 338 BC this was where Philip II established his supremacy in south Greece. After the battle two polyandria (common tombs) were erected on the positions occupied by the two rival forces. The site where the Macedonians were burried was discovered three kilometers to the east of Chaironeia and it was excavated during 1902-1903 by the Ephor of Antiquities Sotiriadis. It is a tumulus seven meters high.

At the point where the members of the Theban Sacred Band were burried, a colossal lion was erected facing the Macedonian tumulus. In ancient times the lion was assembled by five marble pieces. At some point the sculpture collapsed and shattered, probably as a result of a subsidence of the ground, an earhquake, or the poor quality of the stone the base was made of.

The poet Byron found it in pieces when he visited it from Ioannina in 1809. Crawford discovered the head and a few pieces during an improvised excavation in 1818, but covered them again. The Turkish Sultan wanted the lion for Constantinople and Ali Pasa for Ioannina, but they gave up their claims because of transportation difficulties. In 1834 a restoration effort was abandoned because of lack of funds. 

The site was finally properly excavated by the Archaeological Society of Greece in 1874 and the skeletons of 254 men were found burried in seven rows within the enclosure. The restoration of the lion began in 1902 by sculptors Phytalis and Sochos with funds provided by the Archaeological Society. A pedestal 3m. high was constructed and the pieces were reassembled- with missing pieces being restored with stone from Leivadia’s Xiria.

During the period 1998-2000 the monument was conserved- the surface was cleaned and the mortar was replaced- by the IX Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in collaboration with the Centre of Stone of the Greek Ministry of Culture. 

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fleurdulys:

La lettura (Catullus e Clodia) - Giulio Aristide Sartorio

fleurdulys:

La lettura (Catullus e Clodia) - Giulio Aristide Sartorio

(via byronofrochdale)

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forthegothicheroine:

I really do enjoy the opening of Bride of Frankenstein…
Lord Byron: I am LORD BYRON!  I am BOMBASTIC and convinced that EVERTYTHING including the weather is really about ME!
Percy Shelley: I am Percy Shelly.  I have nothing to contribute to this scene, so it’s a good thing I’m pretty.
Mary Shelly: My dress is amazing.  Also, I wrote a genre-defining novel and just cranked out another while you losers were reciting poetry.  Wait, where’s Polidori?
Lord Byron and Percy Shelley: Who cares!

forthegothicheroine:

I really do enjoy the opening of Bride of Frankenstein…

Lord Byron: I am LORD BYRON!  I am BOMBASTIC and convinced that EVERTYTHING including the weather is really about ME!

Percy Shelley: I am Percy Shelly.  I have nothing to contribute to this scene, so it’s a good thing I’m pretty.

Mary Shelly: My dress is amazing.  Also, I wrote a genre-defining novel and just cranked out another while you losers were reciting poetry.  Wait, where’s Polidori?

Lord Byron and Percy Shelley: Who cares!

(via byronofrochdale)

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“It is a moment at which he [Saint-Just] deserves our admiration. He knows that Robespierre’s life is threatened by his enemies on the Committee. Although he is Robespierre’s friend he has only to say nothing, and it is likely that his reputation with the army will save him. But he is not that sort of man. His pride, if not his friendship, prevents such a betrayal. He stands up alone to protect Robespierre, and does not even say a word in his own defense.”
— J.M. Thompson, Leaders of the French Revolution (pg. 204)

“It is a moment at which he [Saint-Just] deserves our admiration. He knows that Robespierre’s life is threatened by his enemies on the Committee. Although he is Robespierre’s friend he has only to say nothing, and it is likely that his reputation with the army will save him. But he is not that sort of man. His pride, if not his friendship, prevents such a betrayal. He stands up alone to protect Robespierre, and does not even say a word in his own defense.”

— J.M. Thompson, Leaders of the French Revolution (pg. 204)

(Source: unspeakablevice)

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fragilityofart:

Laurence Koe (active 1888-1904) 

fragilityofart:

Laurence Koe (active 1888-1904) 

(via mythologer)